RTH Gives Back: Giannathon presented by KeyBank

Rock The House had the privilege to entertain at Giannathon – A family-friendly event which raised $25,000 for Alex’s Lemonade Foundation for childhood cancer research. The event honored the young hero, Gianna Andolina, and her amazing family who discovered Gianna’s leukemia diagnosis when she was only 3-years old.

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Tracy Geagan
Documentary & Lifestyle Photography

Giannathon is the brainchild of Gianna Andolina’s parents, Julie and Adam. Gianna was diagnosed with leukemia on June 30, 2014 and began treatment on July 1, 2014. After making sure their daughter had the proper care at the Cleveland Clinic, Julie and Adam began researching childhood cancer to better educate themselves.”

The event, which was promoted as a “family-friendly dance party,” was packed with youthful energy, love, and support for Gianna and her family. We danced, played, and unapologetically celebrated life – just as Gianna has done through her courageous journey.

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Tracy Geagan
Documentary & Lifestyle Photography

“We honestly could not have asked for more from Matt at Rock the House for our inaugural Giannathon. He was extremely engaging and had so many people on the dance floor throughout the event which is exactly what the event was all about — raising money for pediatric cancer and DANCING!”
– Jenna Zone Tucci (Gianna’s Aunt)

For more information about how to keep up with Gianna and her journey, follow Giannathon on facebook.

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Tracy Geagan
Documentary & Lifestyle Photography

Thank you, Gianna, for the inspiration. Can’t wait til next year!

Photo Credit: Tracy Geagan Photography

5 Layout Questions Event Planners Should Ask Their AV Company

Partnering with the right AV company is extremely important. When planning an event, it is important to ask the right questions. Our friends at Socialtables.com have put together five layout questions to ask your AV partner. You can find more great blogs by going directly to their blog site by clicking here.

 

By Will Curran

When I first started Endless in high school, we did not own all of our own equipment and I had to work with hundreds of AV companies and over time, I learned there was something massively wrong with the industry. There was lack of customer service in the AV industry. At Endless, we sought to change that, so we formed our own audio visual & event production company. Over the years, we learned what the right questions were and how to make sure we were aligned with the event planners vision to create a successful event. So I’m here to share our deepest darkest secrets on how to make your event AV a success, and what the right questions are to ask your AV company when it comes to the layout of your event.

PS: I always try to explain the super technical terms in a simple manner, but if you want to arm yourself with the technical terms to talk to your next AV company, we created a free production guide infographic which will explain some of the common terms we use every day!

Where is front of house?

Front Of House is defined as the location (sometimes it’s placed on a small stage riser) where the audio, lighting and sometimes video technician have their controls for the event. The best location for this is a place where the technical team can have an optimal view of the entire stage and all of the various elements they are controlling. While each has its advantages and disadvantages, common locations are in the center rear of the room, the center of the room (in the middle of all of the seating/standing), and the middle (not the rear and not the front) but off to either the left or right side. On occasion, your technicians may also place themselves behind the stage.

The reason this question is important is because depending on the amount of AV you have at your event, this may take up significant portion of your footprint. Also depending on what you are looking to accomplish for your event, the location that the AV team has in mind for your event may not work with what you are looking to do. Also, if the AV team is planning on being backstage, and you want them in the rear of the room. There may be added costs by adding more additional cabling such as an audio snake (a simple way of moving lots of cables with one single cable) or a switch to wireless (in the case of lighting primarily). If it works for your event, we recommend putting the front of house off to either side but in the middle of the room because this allows the technicians to see what the audience sees however, doesn’t sacrifice anyone’s view.

If your event does not have lighting, it is very common to see that your AV team requests to be behind the stage because they do not need a front of house. With the advancement of technology, many audio boards can be controlled by an iPad in the hand of a roaming technician, and video can be hidden behind the stage by using preview monitors.

Where are you getting power from?

Often times, a planner doesn’t worry about where power (electricity) is coming from for their event (to be honest a planner shouldn’t have to) but often the AV company might forget about this minor, yet critical, detail until the very last minute. The reason it is important to ask this question is because you may have power needs as well and it’s important to collaborate to see where each of you is going to get that from. Also it’s very important because when working with an event that has substantial power needs, you need to mark on your layout where a power drop (large boxes which are used to convert power) might be placed. If the AV team needs the power placed on stage left, and it was placed on stage right, it might force them to rerun all of the cabling they had planned.

 

Where are the cables going to be run?

Unfortunately, the AV industry hasn’t gotten to the point where EVERYTHING is wireless yet (we’re keeping our fingers crossed) and the industry standard for reliability reasons is that all of the various elements of an event must communicate using wired technology. It’s important to ask the AV company where it plans to run cables for a few reasons including: safety, aesthetics, and your personal preference. The movement of cables can severely affect the layout and what technologies are used.

The first being safety. The industry standard is that whenever a cable runs across a walkway or a doorway that it will be taped down. However, some venues and planners require stricter cable management requirements. It is best to know this early on. The difference between taping a cable down and running it through an elaborate cable system can add hours of labor time and added costs to your final invoice.

Second being aesthetics. At Endless, we are constantly trying to find new innovative ways to make our setups look cleaner and keep cables hidden. However, some planners are very particular about seeing cables. For example, most AV companies consider backstage a “sacred” place where you can be a bit messier with your cables because only talent and the technicians will see the cables. However, if you’d like back of stage to look super tidy and clean, let your technicians know and they will take the extra effort to make it look clean. Also, some AV companies use cable ramps to cover cables however these tend to be bright yellow to avoid tripping. If you do not like the look of cable ramps, other options need to be discussed.

Last is personal preference. We recognize that everyone has their own personal preference when it comes to cables. For example, we have had planners who do not want any cables running where people are walking, whether it’s protected by tape or cable ramp. This requires the AV team to rethink how it is going to run that cable then and may affect your layout. Another example, if you do not want cables running across a walkway, but there is no way to get the cable there, then you may have to rethink that walkway or if that piece of equipment needs to be placed there.

If you have to run cables over a long distance and you want to save aesthetics, and safety, AV companies can rig (hang) cables across the ceiling, however, keep in mind that rigging costs (especially if you aren’t rigging already) may go up for this.

Are the projectors front projection or rear projection?

This may seem like a very simple question but it has a whole host of repercussions based on the decision of you and the AV company. This is one of those questions that you OR your AV company should be asking and there are pros and cons to both. Your AV team should be able to do either rear or front projection and if you have a preference, let your AV team know.

If you are rear projecting, your projections will be placed behind stage. This is great if you are looking to safe footprint in front of the stage. It’s also great if you want to avoid when people walk in front of the screen and have a shadow cast on them. However, the downside is you need “throw distance” (the amount of distance needed to fill the entire screen) and if you don’t have enough room behind stage, then this might not be possible. However, be sure to ask if they have any “short throw” projectors available that need less distance to project though they might be more expensive.

Front projection is obviously the opposite of rear projection. If you front project, you have to keep in mind that you need to place the projector in front of the stage and that may be a location that a seat or table currently occupies. In your layout, the AV company should be placing your projector and screen and calculating it’s exact location. There is a compromise to doing front projection but not taking up footprint, and that is to rig the projector to truss (metal systems used to hang lighting, video, etc) or to the ceiling. Keep in mind though, rigging is not possible in all venues, nor can it be cheap.

What is this all going to look like, really look like?

So your AV company has created this epic list of equipment and verbally explained that it’s everything you’re looking for, and you feel happy, but it feels like something is missing. Then the day of the event shows up, and it’s NOTHING like you expected. The screens are smaller than expected, the stage is too small, and there isn’t enough lighting!

There is a very simple way to avoid this from ever happening to you. Request a 3D computer assisted design (CAD) from your AV company. Most AV companies do not offer this because they take a long time to make, but if you request one, they should be willing to do one because it will make sure everyone is on the same page. A 3D CAD will allow the AV company to transform your list of equipment into a three-dimensional rendering of exactly what the stage, screens, lighting, video and everything will look like. Modern CAD software even let you see what it looks like with the lights in different colors and even do fly-throughs of the event so you can see what it will be like to be there!

Quick Tip: While the first CAD design can be easy. Try to get it perfect in as little amount of revisions as possible. Sometimes the first CAD may be free, however, the 3rd or 4th revision may costs you money (especially if it’s a complete overhaul).

At Endless, we found that many of our clients weren’t on the same page with us as far as what it would like and where things went so we now include 3D CADs and simple layouts for all our events so that we are all on the same page.

Rock The House Adds 4 ISES Wow! Awards

Dale McDonald Photography

Dale McDonald Photography

On Friday, April 17th, the who’s who of the local events industry congregated in Columbus, Ohio to celebrate the 4th Annual ISES Ohio WOW! Awards. Cameron Mitchell Premier Events hosted the assembly, and the Ivory Room of Downtown Columbus provided the illustrious setting. Representatives from more than 20 Ohio based event and entertainment groups and corporations were present.

ISES, which stands for the International Special Events Society, has a Cleveland chapter that’s been active since 2008. The 100 plus member organization hosts events throughout the year designed to help companies like Rock The House grow and expand their reach, all while giving back to the special events community.

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Dale McDonald Photography

“Our events have allowed our members to learn more about how to market their business in the 21st century, how to explore green and organic options for more sustainable events, how to accommodate different ethnic and cultural traditions into their events, what trends to watch for in the future, and so much more!”ISESCleveland.com

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Dale McDonald Photography

Also, as with any business, ISES imparts the importance of networking and community outreach. With the multitude of representatives from like minded organizations always in attendance, these events provide a stage for just that. Representing Rock The House was Founder & CEO – Matt Radicelli, COO – Ryan Konikoff, and Executive Assistant to the CEO – Amy Van Duyne.

This year RTH proudly captured four WOW awards, including:

  • 2015 Best Corporate Event with a budget over $150,000
  • 2015 Best Social Event with a budget over $75,000
  • 2015 Best Entertainment Production with a budget between $25,000 – $75,000
  • 2015 Best ISES Event Volunteer Collaboration

2015 ISES WOW Winner

“It was a pleasure to hang out with other members from the ISES Columbus and ISES Cincinnati chapters, and we were proud to bring four awards home for ISES Cleveland!” – Amy Van Duyne of Rock The House

The ISES Event Volunteer Collaboration recognition was bestowed upon Rock The House and some of their associates for an event called ‘A Mammoth Night of Networking.’ Rock The House partnered with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Event Source, Solus Lighting and Executive Caterers to make that night a huge success.

Rock The House also expresses a special congratulations to our sister company, Zone Entertainment, who came home with three additional WOW awards!

Over the years Rock The House has impressively collected 13 total ISES Ohio WOW! Awards. With the company rapidly growing, it doesn’t appear they’ll be slowing down anytime soon.

Live Event Content Creation

Rock The House finds value in working together with other vendors to provide educational value to our partners. Thanks to our friends at SocialTables and their guest author, Juraj Holub for this great article and research featuring 20 new ideas for creative content and use of Social Media during events.

Originally posted on February 23, 2015.

LIVE TWEETING

  1. Live tweet: Live-tweeting blends audience participation with live micro journalism.  And it’s usually the main channel of content distribution during your event. Make sure to feed your Twitter account with the following tweets:
    – Tweet insights: Try to capture the essence of your speakers’ talks and tweet the most interesting facts and figures they present.
    – Share speakers
    ’ quotes: People have this innate craving for good quotes. Tweet the best quotes from your speakers. They often get loads of re-shares.
    – Tweet with pictures: Attach pictures to your tweets to significantly increase engagement and reach.
    – Retweet a lot: Your attendees’ tweets are an endless source of powerful insights and they are genuine captures from your event. Show attendees some love and retweet them generously.For more tips on live-tweeting at conferences, check out this guide.

VIDEO

  1. Video testimonials: Video your attendees and capture their impressions from your event – ask about what they’ve learned, which speaker inspired them the most, etc.
  2. Video thought leaders: Video thought leaders and get their comments on the topics that are being presented and discussed at your event.
  3. Video exhibitors: Exhibitors are often overlooked at events. Have your exhibitors say on camera how they can or want to help your attendees.
  4. Share industry predictions: People love predictions. Ask the key figures in the industry to share their views about the upcoming trends in your niche.
  5. Share behind-the-scenes video: Video how your team is setting up or running the event. It gives your event a powerful touch of authenticity and links a human element to your brand.
  6. Shoot time-lapse: Time-lapse videos are surprisingly underused and therefore can have a big WOW factor on viewers. Try to capture the movement of people to magnify the time-lapse effect. Check out this article to learn how to take amazing time-lapse video with your iPhone.
  7. Record Vines: Looping videos are really trending and an easy way to make your event go viral!
  8. You can share them easily via Twitter or Instagram. Humor is the key here! Here are 5 tips for using them effectively at conferences.

BLOG IDEAS

  1. Share your story: Share your personal challenges from organizing your event in a blog post. People always crave genuine stories.
  2. How-to blog: Did something work particularly well? What is the key takeaway from organizing your event? Share your lessons with your peers.
  3. Invite delegates to submit their blog posts: Leverage the potential of the crowd and ask your delegates to share their stories from your conference – main takeaways, how-to’s, key learning points, etc.
  4. Share your speakers’ bios: Spice it up with additional questions about their professional life. It’s a win-win. You get great content with no effort and your speakers get more visibility.
  5. Post-event Q&A: If you use a Q&A platform such as sli.do at your event, email the archived questions that were not answered to your speakers. Ask them to respond to them in the form of video or a blog post. Your audience will love you for providing them the answers that they didn’t hear from the stage. For more tips, take a look at post-event Q&A with the speakers from Pioneers festival.

PHOTOS

  1. Sneak peak photos: Whet your delegates’ appetites by showing a sneak peek of your event being set up, hotel lobbies, surrounding area, etc.
  2. Collect selfies: “Selfies are the new autographs,” said Julia Hartz from Eventbrite. At events, where people have the chance to meet their ‘heroes’ and colleagues, they take a lot of them. Share them! People love reliving the joyful moments.
  3. Publish candid photos: While you often need to wait for a couple of days for the official pictures, you can share attendees’ candid captures instantly. You can also encourage more photo sharing by displaying picture tweets on the Twitter walls.
  4. Post a photo collage: Create a photo collage from tons of pictures accumulated at your conference. A tool like PicMonkey can help you create one.

MISCELLANEOUS

  1. Share speakers’ presentations: Sometimes content is already there, it just needs to be shared. ALWAYS ask your speakers for permission to share their presentations!
  2. Share your event story: Collect pictures, tweets or videos from your event with Storify and share them in one consistent report.
  3. Event Infographics: There is so much data accumulated at events these days. It calls for graphic interpretation. You can include the number of attendees and speakers, the number of questions asked, the number of drunk coffees, and so on. Use infogr.am to create beautiful infographics in a super easy way.

– Read more at: www.socialtables.com.

Guest Author: Juraj Holub is the Marketing Manager at sli.do. Sli.do is an award-winning Q&A and polling platform for live events that allows everyone in the audience to ask questions and vote on live polls via their mobile devices.

Connect with him at @Juraj_Holub

Cleveland Rocks New Year’s Eve

CLE Rocks NYE

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Rock The House is honored to have been chosen as the official production partner of Cleveland New Year’s Eve Alliance and the Ohio Homecoming Group’s “Cleveland Rocks New Year’s Eve” this year in downtown Cleveland! Celebrating our hometown with other passionate business owners is a privilege made even better by partners we call friends.

Last year’s event was unbelievably big and this year the plans have the event expanding to include more acts, indoor accommodations and more! With acts like Machine Gun KellyCarlos Jones and E-V, there’s no doubt this is going to be an incredible celebration of a new year and Cleveland.

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RTH Founder/Owner Matt Radicelli, Ohio Homecoming’s Alonzo Mitchell, Hotcards CEO, John Gadd

Rock The House Brings Think Tank to Cleveland

In July, Rock The House won the bid to bring Think Tank to Cleveland, a national organization for entrepreneurs that specialize in production and entertainment. The purpose of this event was to provide an educational and networking opportunity for all members of the organization while taking a concierge level approach to hospitality at every turn. We blended top-notch educational content with world-class audio / visual production, and provided fresh excursions and team building opportunities. To deliver a true Cleveland experience, events were held throughout the downtown area with our partners at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Corner Alley, Marriott Downtown, Pura Vida, Hospitality Management Center, House of Blues, and Barley House.

The goals and objectives for the event were clear; offer members a high-end production conference while providing exceptional networking and educational opportunities. This included professional and personal growth while showcasing our fantastic city in the process.

First, the educational committee needed to serve world-class education to its members. In order to over deliver, the committee acquired speaking talent that doesn’t typically present to smaller fee conference categories. Their ability to think big allowed the team to secure two nationally known presenters, Jeffrey Gitomer and Mike Michalowitz.

Another success factor was offering a fresh perspective for education and activities – to allow the organization’s members to experience much of the downtown area. The planning committee strategically chose a centrally located downtown hotel. During the first day, an interactive team building activity was offered as team members set out to complete a 15-item scavenger hunt in the downtown area… with nothing but their cell phones. During the challenge, each team posted their findings to Instagram using a custom hashtag that was instantly displayed in the educational space.

To avoid a typical conference feel, the team decided that the House of Blues would be an intimate yet fitting feature venue for the first day of education. Besides being in awe of the decor and their surroundings, attendees thoroughly enjoyed the fresh and unique scenery.

Completing the powerful first day of education, attendees enjoyed a custom bracketed bowling tournament complete with trivia contests, prizes and other exciting giveaways at Corner Alley. Afterward, there were optional “workshops” at the Marriott Downtown, the host hotel. The topics discussed were the “overflow” items that didn’t make it into the main education but were still important to attendees. These were extremely valuable to all who attended.

Day two was filled with compelling content at the Marriott, with a truly amazing and unique audio-visual setup that kept everyone guessing. After the day of education was over, attendees walked to the Hospitality Management Center where a custom pizza-making challenge involved all members of the convention. Teams split up, created team names, chose toppings, and prepared/baked their pizza. Along with that, they also designed marketing materials and even recorded commercials for their creations. The challenge finished with a charity auction that raffled off swag from members’ companies. All proceeds benefitted an organization that helps industry business owners in their times of need. After that, the group capped the night off at Barley House, where members of the convention each had a chance to compete in a surprise DJ competition.

Day three ended on a high note; a trolley tour was scheduled after the edutainment was completed, adding a special sightseeing touch to provide a short tour around downtown. This concluded at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, providing the perfect venue for the awards ceremony and free time for attendees to get the chance to peruse the memorabilia.

Since the conference attendance was highly encouraged by all members, small bits of information and short video teasers were sent out leading up to the time together so all members were excited before they even arrived into the city.

With a conference that moves to a new city every year, Rock The House was pleased to host and exceed the expectations of the organizational board to produce a conference that was not only inspirational and professional but also set the bar high for the next city.